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Poster Review: X-Men: First Class

I realize I'm piling on at this point, but today this was unveiled:

6a0120a721c2d7970b014e610f5366

Apparently the moment that changed the world is the introduction of Photoshop, allowing legions of under-qualitified designers to perform un-licensed head strips. This is truly a horrifying concept, and we must send a Terminator back in time to terminate George Lucas before he founded ILM, thereby stopping Photoshop before it could be created, saving legions of illustrator's jobs and making the world a little prettier.

Also, X-Men 2 did this concept (if you can call it that), much, much better:

X_men_two_ver5

This is the latest in a long line of epic fail posters for this film:


If you told me these were fan-created, I would believe you. If you told me they were official, I might have a breakdown. Please don't do that to me.


These are sort of colorful, and don't feature blatant Photoshop disasters, but are fairly underwhelming, especially the taglines.

Xmen_first_class

It's kind of sad that the logo poster is the least offensive one for a picture of this size. Actually, this one isn't offensive, the metal rendering is quite nice.


Zachary Pennington

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skype: zacharyasherpennington

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